5.3 Tools for Diversity Training

Have a look at our compilation of tools for diversity training.

What is Worth How Much to Whom?

Field of application

Dealing with diversity

Resume / Brief description

 

From a list of values and characteristics that are important in their group, the participants identify those with the highest priority by comparing two values.

Target group

Students

Lecturers

Entrepreneurs

Colleagues of the same company or work team

Colleagues working in intercultural contexts

Professionals of different area

Group size

There is a minimum of 10 participants for this exercise. The ideal size is 20-30 participants.

Objectives

The activity has the objective

 

  • To determine the relative importance of different values that are important in teamwork

Requirements

Materials

 

  • List “Values at work in intercultural teams”
  • Index cards
  • Stopwatch
  • Signal

Room arrangement

 

  • Furnishing the mediators' corner with chairs

Time

 

  • 30-60 minutes (depending on the number of participants and number of values)

Implementation - Guidelines

 

 

 

 

1.       Preparation

 

  • Take the list and select one value less than you have participants.
  • Write each of the selected values on a separate index card.

 

2.       Process

 

  • Choose a mediator to take a seat in the meditator's seat.
  • Distribute the value cards. Each participant except the mediator receives a card.
  • Explain that each card contains a value that is important for cooperation.
  • Determine the value with the highest priority (15 minutes).
  • Participants form pairs and prioritise the values on their cards.
  • The participant with the card that was not chosen gives it to the leader and goes to the mediator's corner. New couples are formed and a new selection process starts.
  • If the couples cannot decide, the mediator will do it.
  • After the mediation, the couple sits down on the mediator chairs and the mediator goes to the playing area with the more important values card.
  • The activity ends when there is only one participant that has a value card.

 

3.       Debriefing

 

To debrief, you can reflect on the following questions:

 

  • What are the benefits of putting this value into practice?
  • How strongly is this value lived by the team members at the present time, and how does it show?
  • What would happen if this value was disregarded?
  • How can this value be lived in the collaboration?
  • How can the awareness and acceptance of this value be promoted among the team members?

Additional format/references

Thiagarajan, S. (2016). Interaktive Trainingsmethoden: Thiagis Aktivitäten für berufliches, interkulturelles und politisches Lernen in Gruppen (3. Auflage.). Schwalbach: Wochenschau Verlag.

Unruly Participants

 

Field of application

Dealing with diversity

Resume / Brief description

 

Different teams receive written envelopes with different categories of disruptive behaviour. Participants collect guidelines on how to deal with their behaviour, write these guidelines on a card and put them in the envelope. The teams pass the cards on in rotation and thus develop guidelines. In the evaluation phase, the team members discuss the cards with the guidelines and determine the five best suggestions.

 

Target group

Students

Lecturers

Entrepreneurs

Colleagues of the same company or work team

Colleagues working in intercultural contexts

Professionals of different area

Group size

There is a minimum of 3 participants and a maximum of 60 participants for this activity. The ideal size is 12-28 participants.

Objectives

The activity has the objective

 

  • To develop strategies to deal with different categories of conspicuous and disruptive behaviour during teaching sessions.

Requirements

Materials

 

  • Four envelopes
  • Three empty index cards per team
  • Stopwatch
  • Signal  

Time

  • 25-45 minutes

Implementation - Guidelines

 

 

 

 

1.       Preparation

 

  • Select four categories of disruptive participants from the list.
  • Label each of the four envelopes with a theme.

 

 2.       Process

 

  • Instruct the participants.
  • Remember situations with unruly participants.
  • Invite participants to consider strategies for prevention.
  • Divide the participants into four approximately equally sized groups with a maximum of 6 members.
  • The teams sit in a circle to facilitate the exchange of envelopes.
  • Each team receives an envelope and three index cards.

 

First round (3 minutes)

 

  • The teams discuss guidelines on how to deal with the disruptive behaviour under discussion.
  • Guidelines are recorded on the index cards.
  • The Index cards are put into the envelope after the sound signal and passed on to the next team.

Second round (3 minutes)

 

  • The participants discuss about the next category of disruptive behaviour.
  • It is not allowed to look at the answers in the envelope.
  • New answers will be put back in envelope.

Third round (3 minutes)

 

  • Runs like the rounds before.

Evaluation stage

 

  • The cards in the envelopes are rated.
  • The five best proposals on all cards are selected.
  • One person per team presents and discusses the results.

 

3.       Debriefing

 

To debrief, you can reflect on the following question:

 

  • Which category was the most difficult for the participants?

Additional format/references

Thiagarajan, S. (2016). Interaktive Trainingsmethoden: Thiagis Aktivitäten für berufliches, interkulturelles und politisches Lernen in Gruppen (3. Auflage.). Schwalbach: Wochenschau Verlag.

Dealing with Difficult Participants

Field of application

Dealing with diversity

Resume / Brief description

 

Participants collect words, thoughts and behaviours of difficult participants on life-size paper silhouettes to gain new perspectives on their options for action.

Target group

Students

Lecturers

Entrepreneurs

Colleagues of the same company or work team

Colleagues working in intercultural contexts

Professionals of different area

Group Size

There is a minimum of 4 participants and a maximum of 30 participants for this activity. The ideal size is 8-20 participants.

Objectives

The activity has the objective

  • To develop strategies for dealing with different categories of disruptive behaviour during interactive sessions.
  • To positively engage the participants concerned.

Requirements

 

Materials

 

  • 20-30 sheets of flipchart paper
  • 1 pair of scissors
  • Masking tape
  • 1 marker
  • 20 sheets each of coloured and white A4 paper
  • 10 pin boards or space on the wall to hang up silhouettes

Time

 

  • 25-45 minutes

Implementation - Guidelines

 

 

 

 

1.       Preparation

 

  • Create a paper silhouette for each difficult participant type with enough space to collect ideas and a short description of the participant type.
  • Create speech bubbles, hearts, and plus signs using the A4 paper.
  • Blank pieces of paper with the following questions:
    • What does he/she wish...? (beside the heart)
    • What does he/she say...? (stick it next to the speech bubble)
    • What does he/she think...? (stick next to the head)
    • What does he/she contribute...? (next to the plus sign)
    • What does he/she...? (stick into the body at the height of the hands).

2.       Process

 

  • Preparing the types (15-20 minutes)
    • Ask the group to remember situations with difficult participants and invite the participants to write on the silhouettes according to the questions.
  • Group division
    • Participants should assign themselves to the types with which they want to continue to work, per type at least 2 participants.
  • Processing of the types (15-20 minutes)
    • The teams discuss possibilities in dealing with the difficult participants and how to use their peculiarities productively for the group. The results are recorded on the flipchart.
  • Presentation of the results (3 minutes for each type)
    • The teams present the most important ideas in dealing with their types.

3.       Debriefing

 

  • Short feedback round on the results and on the most important findings.

Additional format/references

 

Thiagarajan, S. (2016). Interaktive Trainingsmethoden: Thiagis Aktivitäten für berufliches, interkulturelles und politisches Lernen in Gruppen (3. Auflage.). Schwalbach: Wochenschau Verlag.

The Coordinate Mesh

Field of application

Dealing with diversity

Resume / Brief description

 

This activity belongs in the category of structured #exchange and promotes #self-observation output and #self-confidence

The exercise should be done as an #individual activity.

Target group

Students

Lecturers

Entrepreneurs

Colleagues of the same company or work team

Colleagues working in intercultural contexts

Professionals of different area

Group size

Optional

Objectives

The activity has the objective

 

  • To recognise personal likes and dislikes
  • To create a personal plan to achieve useful results
  • To appreciate what has been achieved and avoid the undesirable
  • To accept things that are beyond your control

Requirements

Materials

 

  • One coordinate grid per participant (fold an A4 paper or similar in the middle and then fold again - open the paper and number the quadrants with a fine line as follows

4

1

3

2

 

Time

 

  • 45-60 minutes

Implementation - Guidelines

 

 

 

 

1.       Process

 

Write the following in the four quadrants:

 

  • 1st quadrant
    • Create a list of things you want and currently have
  • 2nd quadrant
    • Create a list of things you want but do not have at the moment
  • 3rd quadrant
    • Create a list of things you do not want and currently do not have
  • 4th quadrant
    • Create a list of things you do not want but currently have

 

2.       Consolidation

 

  • Go through the list of thought aids and if necessary, add something to the quadrants

 

3.       Debriefing

 

Reflect on the process and your feelings when filling in the coordinate grid. The instructor or moderator will ask a series of questions. The participants think about the answers and try to find out what they mean.

 

  • Process review
    • Did you feel good or bad during the writing process?
    • Do you like or dislike thinking about yourself?
    • Did you feel calm and concentrated or rather harassed and unfocused?
    • Did you proceed systematically, or did you jump back and forth between the quadrants?
    • Did you proceed at a steady pace, or did you stay with one task for a short time or for a longer time with another?
    • Were you biased or did you feel as if someone else was analysing you?
    • Did you always keep an eye on the time, or did you forget it completely?
    • Do you know how much time you spent on this activity? Did it take longer than you expected? Or less long?
    • Did the thought aids give you additional ideas? Or did you hardly get anything at all?
  • Content check
    • Which points came to your mind quickly and spontaneously? And which ones did you have to dig out slowly?
    • Which quadrants have more or less points than the others?
    • Which points did you think of many times in your life and which ones appeared out of nowhere?
    • Which points are about you directly and which are about other people?
    • Which points are about people, which are about objects?
  • Comparisons between two quadrants
    • Comparison of number and meaning of the points on the right side with those on the left side. What does this say about your focus on negative or positive aspects?
    • Comparison of the number and importance of the points in the upper half with those in the lower half of the coordinator network. What does this say about your focus on the current and future?
    • Compare the number and meaning of the points in the diagonally opposite quadrants 1 and 3 with those of quadrants 2 and 4. What does this say about their tendency to optimism and pessimism, respectively?

Additional format/references

Thiagarajan, S. (2016). Interaktive Trainingsmethoden: Thiagis Aktivitäten für berufliches, interkulturelles und politisches Lernen in Gruppen (3. Auflage.). Schwalbach: Wochenschau Verlag.